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Need-To-Know Trends for 2018

David Shove-Brown and David Tracz of //3877 give i+s a sample of what to expect in the upcoming year.

01.08.2018

David Shove-Brown David Tracz The Courtyard Marriott Fort Worth project by //3877 illustrates the use of color in contemporary projects. The Courtyard Marriott Fort Worth project by //3877 illustrates the use of color in contemporary projects. The Courtyard Marriott Fort Worth project by //3877 illustrates the use of color in contemporary projects. The Courtyard Marriott Fort Worth project by //3877 illustrates the use of color in contemporary projects. The Courtyard Marriott Fort Worth project by //3877 illustrates the use of color in contemporary projects. The Smith Washington DC location by //3877 illustrates the use of metallics to heighten muted tones. The Smith Washington DC location by //3877 illustrates the use of metallics to heighten muted tones. The Smith Washington DC location by //3877 illustrates the use of metallics to heighten muted tones. The Slipstream space by //3877 illustrates the use of tactile elements and splashy wall-coverings. The Slipstream space by //3877 illustrates the use of tactile elements and splashy wall-coverings. The Slipstream space by //3877 illustrates the use of tactile elements and splashy wall-coverings. The Slipstream space by //3877 illustrates the use of tactile elements and splashy wall-coverings.

What is on the horizon for 2018? What should we expect to see in the commercial design sector?
“A departure from 2017 design schemes, in 2018 we expect to see spaces infused with warmer tones and textures. Metallic finishes will be at the center of this shift, being used to emphasize muted shades and ornate craftsman details for a modern twist on old school maximalism.
The integration of technology in both furniture and overall design schemes is set to increase tremendously. Advances in technology, paired with its frequent use, make for a strong argument for its integration. The idea of the smart room will no longer be an idea, but a reality.”  - David Shove-Brown

What about color usage in 2018? Materials?
“We will see a return to bright colorways with regard to textiles and wallcoverings. Muted tones that fall in line with minimalist design schemes will be replaced with splashier hues that celebrate a return to maximalism—with a modern twist, of course. Maximalist details will not be just built upon an increased use in color, but on the layering in of tactile elements that draw the eye in and draft a rich, multifaceted environment.” - David Tracz 

How is technology impacting the design industry?
“Technology has had a profound impact across sectors, but has become increasingly influential in the design industry. An occupation long-dependent on creating models to create a sale or push an idea, technology has stepped in to provide enhanced efficiency across the board. Virtual reality has been especially critical in allowing for a more streamlined approach to designing for commercial clients. The scale of the projects and the often global connect with these require aligning many moving points. Sharing ideas and concepts via VR allows for these to be shared at the drop of a hat. Creation, as well as revision processes, are shortened in time, opening the door to increased output and higher client retention. As more technology of this form comes around, this process will only become more streamlined.” - David Tracz

Are there any design trends in particular that will be making a departure?
“The industrial chic aesthetic of late that has been defined by the use of reclaimed wood, edison bulbs, and library shelves filled to the brim with knick-knacks is taking some time off come 2018. The combination of these items attempts to find value in design elements that connect to the surrounding environment. However, more often than not, the connection fails and lacks authenticity in the space the designer is ardently trying to create. Styling spaces in this light is too obvious to be authentic, and in turn will push designers toward incorporating components that connect through their construction process or conception.” - David Shove-Brown

Are there trends that have overstayed their welcome?
“Neon signs have had their time in the spotlight. Taking an exit stage left, these whimsical, albeit cheesy, signs have been overdone and overplayed. Adding a pop of color to accentuate a larger design scheme at work will still be popular but achieved through other means, such as muted metallic detailing and tactile elements. The way in which detail is added to a space is set to change. Shelves of knick-knacks and locally sourced products are overplayed and need to be rethought in order for authentic spaces to be created.” - David Tracz