Originally published in Interiors & Sources

06/28/2013

Take Control of Lighting Upgrades

How an in-house audit can uncover big savings

By

 
  • /Portals/1/images/Magazines/2013/0713/B_0713_Audits5.jpg

    The Brae Burn Country Club in Newton, MA, wanted to cut energy use in a way that was basically invisible to visitors. The team focused hard on lighting quality, color rendition, visual comfort, and load reduction. Savings opportunities discovered during the assessment process included replacing T12s with T5s in office spaces (above), which cut connected wattage by over 50%. Outside, replacing incandescents and HIDs with LEDs reduced the connected load by over 60%.
    Credit: KILOJOLTS

  • /Portals/1/images/Magazines/2013/0713/B_0713_Audits6.jpg

    The Brae Burn Country Club in Newton, MA, wanted to cut energy use in a way that was basically invisible to visitors. The team focused hard on lighting quality, color rendition, visual comfort, and load reduction. Savings opportunities discovered during the assessment process included replacing T12s with T5s in office spaces (above), which cut connected wattage by over 50%. Outside, replacing incandescents and HIDs with LEDs reduced the connected load by over 60%.
    Credit: KILOJOLTS

Watch Out for These Challenges
These three issues can throw a wrench into your auditing plans. Take pains to avoid them for optimal results.

Complexity: Some well-meaning FMs may not remember to catalog every single space. Does the janitor’s closet have a light in it? If so, that lamp must be counted and the space must be measured. Rebates and incentives add another layer of difficulty because the sheer detail required can be overwhelming, Bridges notes.

Documentation: Mistakes in measurements can derail plans for financial rewards, Bridges says: “You can miss out on your tax deductions or rebates because something wasn’t documented correctly.”

That’s why it’s important to take exact measurements – many tax deductions are based on square footage, so some of your rooms may qualify, while others won’t.

Strategy: It’s easy to overlook certain opportunities that can yield big savings, Markowitz says. For example, lighting controls and daylight harvesting can dramatically reduce energy consumption, especially when used together. Utilities and state energy programs may even cover some of the cost.

Researching local and state incentives is essential, he adds, because in many areas, the information won’t come to you.

“Many utility and state organizations don’t do a very good job of marketing their efficiency programs,” Markowitz says. “If you’re considering an investment in an energy efficiency project, look for the incentives first. Use other people’s money whenever possible.”

LIGHTING PROJECTS


Bally’s

Atlantic City, NJ

Project Scope:

  • Replace 6,500 150W incandescent lamps with 8W dimmable cold cathode fluorescents.
  • Replace 29 obsolete dimming panels with new digital ones.
  • Replace the computer controlling the dimming system with a new PC, theatrical show controller, and graphical user interface.

Contract Cost: $259,000

Savings: Approximately $135,000 per year

Other Benefits: Lamp life increased from 2,000 hours to 18,000.


Port Authority PATH Car Shop

New York, NY

Project Scope: Replace or upgrade over 1,600 light fixtures in spaces including offices, shops, storage areas, track, pits, and building exterior

Contract Cost: $483,496

Savings: Approximately $121,000 per year

Other Benefits: Low color-rendering HPS light fixtures were replaced with induction lighting on the building exterior and long-life fluorescents on the interior, resulting in better color.

 

Janelle Penny janelle.penny@buildings.com is associate editor of BUILDINGS.


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