10/01/2013

British Gas Goes Green

Scott Brownrigg’s design for British Gas’ new Oxford headquarters harnesses natural energy to power one of the U.K.’s largest producers.

By Elianne Halbersberg  |  Photography by Philip Vile

 
  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_1.jpg

    Dark stone and dandelion graphics on the ground floor walls establish the connection between British Gas and environmentalism early on. Lounge seating from Knoll Studio gives the space a modern, sophisticated feel. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_2.jpg

    Dark stone and dandelion graphics on the ground floor walls establish the connection between British Gas and environmentalism early on. Lounge seating from Knoll Studio gives the space a modern, sophisticated feel. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_3.jpg

    The ground floor includes a restaurant with seating for 200, as well as an adjacent outdoor area that can also be used for dining during the warmer months. The upper two floors include casual meeting areas at the edge of each floorplate. The combination of large and small spaces gives British Gas the flexibility to conduct meetings of all sizes. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_4.jpg

    The ground floor includes a restaurant with seating for 200, as well as an adjacent outdoor area that can also be used for dining during the warmer months. The upper two floors include casual meeting areas at the edge of each floorplate. The combination of large and small spaces gives British Gas the flexibility to conduct meetings of all sizes. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_5.jpg

    The ground floor includes a restaurant with seating for 200, as well as an adjacent outdoor area that can also be used for dining during the warmer months. The upper two floors include casual meeting areas at the edge of each floorplate. The combination of large and small spaces gives British Gas the flexibility to conduct meetings of all sizes. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_6.jpg

    The ground floor includes a restaurant with seating for 200, as well as an adjacent outdoor area that can also be used for dining during the warmer months. The upper two floors include casual meeting areas at the edge of each floorplate. The combination of large and small spaces gives British Gas the flexibility to conduct meetings of all sizes. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_7.jpg

    Scott Brownrigg was involved with both the base building design and the interiors. The design team was tasked with creating functional areas and departments for 740 employees, including “in-between” spaces like the café and business lounge. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_8.jpg

    Scott Brownrigg was involved with both the base building design and the interiors. The design team was tasked with creating functional areas and departments for 740 employees, including “in-between” spaces like the café and business lounge. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_9.jpg

    Touchdown stations with height-adjustable surfaces are located between the office’s themed corner areas, creating open spaces for both solitary work and collaboration. High-backed seating provides space for semi-private conversations. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_10.jpg

    Designers used bold, minimal colors and surfaces to delineate the four corners of the floorplate, named after natural energy sources: sun, wind, earth and water. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_11.jpg

    This waiting area in the “wind” zone maintains a light and airy palette, with lounge seating from Walter Knoll and carpeting from Innerspace. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_12.jpg

    The “water” zone includes vivid wall graphics, pebble-like seating and a screened meeting area that resembles a waterfall, while the “sun” zone comes to life with bright upholsteries and surfaces, along with exposed bulbs from Plumen. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_13.jpg

    The “water” zone includes vivid wall graphics, pebble-like seating and a screened meeting area that resembles a waterfall, while the “sun” zone comes to life with bright upholsteries and surfaces, along with exposed bulbs from Plumen. View larger

  • /Portals/3/images/magazine/2013/1013/I_1013_Web_BritGas_14.jpg

    The three-story green wall located in the building’s atrium acts as an acoustic buffer for the surrounding floors. The atrium includes seating from Moroso and tables from James Burleigh. View larger

British Gas, one of the U.K.’s leading natural gas and electricity suppliers, has been busy as of late with rebranding efforts designed to position it as a consumer-friendly, modern energy provider.

The company has rolled out a new logo, as well as Me, a mobile app that allows customers to track their energy usage and easily split bills between housemates. It also opened the doors to its new Oxford Business Park headquarters, a spacious, contemporary and sustainable facility that reflects the company’s values of energy efficiency and innovation.

Designed by London-based firm Scott Brownrigg, the new 81,000-square-foot building consolidates three separate sites into one three-story space, providing a flexible and inspiring environment for the company’s 740 employees based in the area.

The design concept is built upon the four key sources of renewable energy: sun, wind, earth and water. The floorplates have been divided into four corners, with each one representing a particular element through the use of vivid colors, materials, furnishings and wall graphics. Bright upholsteries and exposed light bulbs fill the “sun” zone, while bubbly water graphics and pebble-shaped conference seating form the “water” zone. These disparate design concepts are pulled together through the repetitive use of a dandelion motif, representing how the four natural energy sources work together to create growth.

One of the project’s most striking additions is a lush, three-story living wall in the atrium—part of the building’s “earth” zone—which acts as a natural air filter and acoustic buffer, and provides what Scott Brownrigg Principal Ken Giannini calls “a beautiful reminder of the connection to nature.” The system, manufactured by U.K.-based Biotecture, has its own irrigation system and was installed in pre-planted panels hung on a frame fixed to the wall.

The office also includes a variety of “in-between spaces”—breakout areas, booths, touchdown workspaces, a business lounge and a café—which are separate from individuals’ desks, and can be used individually or collaboratively. All are supported by Wi-Fi, power connections and refreshment stations.

“They are actually the most important aspects of the workspace, as much of the work takes place in these areas,” says Giannini. “They give the office environment a sense of community, and set the tone for the culture and image of the office.”

The project has been certified as “Excellent” under the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method® (better known as BREEAM), an international green building rating system focusing on low-carbon and low-impact design, and energy and resource conservation. The certification is one step below the system’s top rating of “Outstanding,” but still makes the new British Gas headquarters the highest-rated BREEAM building in the Oxford Business Park.

“This is a rare achievement, especially because [the rating] includes the fit-out and the base building, which is more difficult to achieve,” Giannini notes.

The new facility features rooftop photovoltaic panels, solar thermal panels for hot water heating and biomass boilers for general heating; the firm is currently also fitting the building for rainwater harvesting. Inside, regionally sourced products, environmentally friendly furnishings (as measured by BREEAM’s own Green Guide), LED lighting, sensor-activated lighting controls and an office-wide recycling policy complete British Gas’s ambitious brand repositioning.

“The staff and management of British Gas believe it is their best building, and many staff members bring in clients to showcase the sustainable aspects of the building,” Giannini says. “The workforce is inspired, and we are told they find it a great step up from their previous work environment.”

 

Elianne Halbersberg is a frequent contributor to Interiors & Sources. She has previously covered sustainability, architecture and interior design.

 Contact 

 client 
british gas
Oxford Business Park North
Garsington Road
Cowley
Oxford OX4 2JZ
britishgas.co.uk

 Project Team 
architecture + design
Scott Brownrigg
77 Endell Street
London WC2H 9DZ
+44 (0)20 7240 7766
scottbrownrigg.com

catering consultant
Humble Arnold Associates
humblearnold.com

photography
Philip Vile
philipvile.com

 Sources 

 Flooring 
Innerspace
innerspaceltd.co.uk

 Lighting 
Plumen Lighting
+44 207 650 7882
plumen.com

 Living Wall 
BioTecture
+44 (0)1243 572118
biotecture.uk.com

 Seating 
Knoll Studio
(800) 343-5665
knoll.com

Moroso
+39 0432 577111
moroso.it




Walter Knoll
walterknoll.de

 Shading 
Claxton Solar Shading
+44 (0) 1727 840001
claxton-blinds.com

 Surfacing 
HI-MACS
himacs.eu

Mosa
+31 (0)43 368 94 44
mosa.nl

Strata Tiles
stratatiles.co.uk

 Tables 
James Burleigh
jamesburleigh.co.uk

 

 
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